Older Adults Should Undertake Resistance Training

Fight Aging! by Reason

The evidence from numerous studies of recent years makes it clear that resistance training produces significant benefits to the health and remaining life expectancy of older adults. To put it another way, most people do too little to maintain strength and their health suffers for it. The effects here seem to partially overlap with and partially be distinct from the benefits of aerobic exercise. But the benefits are broad, as indicated in this open access position paper on the subject.

Read More

Reversing Somatic Mosaicism in Aged Tissue

Fight Aging! by Reason

Somatic mosiacism is the tendency for aged tissues to display a mix of mutations, spread through cell lineages from an original mutation in a stem cell or progenitor cell. The consensus in the research community is that this degrades tissue function, contributing to the aging process, but there is a lack of evidence for whether or not this is significant across the present human life span. Clearly eventually it has to become a problem, given ways to deal with all of the other aspects of aging, but without a grasp of the size of the effect, it is hard to say whether or not this issue should be targeted now or later.

Read More

Being Overweight Correlates with Faster Brain Aging

Does carrying excess body weight, meaning inflammatory visceral fat tissue that distorts metabolism in many ways, actually accelerate the processes of aging, or just make all later life health issues worse and shorten life expectancy via unrelated mechanisms? The evidence leans in the direction of actually accelerating aging. Regardless, by now we should all be used to the headlines announcing that yet another aspect of age-related degeneration proceeds faster in overweight individuals.

Read More

Physical Exercise Reduces Brain Inflammation and Microglial Dysfunction

Regular exercise has many beneficial effects on health because it triggers stress response mechanisms that work to maintain cell quality and function. It is worth noting that it isn’t as good at this as the practice of calorie restriction, however. This might be expected from the differing effects of exercise and calorie restriction on life span in short lived species such as laboratory mice. Calorie restriction can improve maximum life span by as much as 40%, while exercise can only improve healthy life span. This isn’t a case of do one or the other, of course. Do both.

Read More